Patricia by Patricia

Patricia by Patricia
Patricia by Patricia

Monday, October 11, 2021

Selling the Soul

 

Patricia Frischer, Bottomless Budha, Mixed media, 2016


When I was running a gallery in London in the mid 70’s, we put labels on all the work with titles, medium and prices because we were in the business of selling work to people who came into the gallery because they were interested in the art on the walls. The gallery specialized in master drawings from the 20th century. At the time these were underpriced because the print boom was in full swing and it was more economical to promote a limited edition of 100 prints than one original drawing. We helped people to learn about these artists and tried to get them to trust us to introduce them to some contemporary artist. I put on the first show of Judy Chicago in London. A show of California artists (now all of note like Sam Francis, Roy de Forest, Sam Richardson, Joan Brown, William Whiley) traveled to many of the capitols of Europe with the aid of the American Embassy which actually had a gallery at that time.

There were galleries, also in the West End, which were dealing in very high end art both modern and contemporary. Sometimes there were no labels or prices as they depended on the snobbery of a patron worth cultivating that would know the artists and his/her worth (mainly his at that time!). This was before installation or video art was much of a thing in London. These galleries often made new collectors buy emerging artist before they were allowed to buy what was presented as a limited number of works by the current art stars. (for example: David Hockney, Patrick Caulfield, Peter Blake, Andy Warhol).

Museums were supposed to supply education about the artists at that time but of course, pricing is never mentioned in those august institutions. The world of art marketing and art collecting was pretty much shrouded in mystery.  In the late 70’s I wrote a book on art marketing for artists just to try to help them understand how this world worked. My hope was that they would not be so frustrated once they knew the system that existed then. At the highest end, this system pretty much still exists. But the times have changed dramatically. You can see art on the internet without having to go to a gallery or an international art fair. The marketplace is at once more available and more confusing.

In this anything goes world, you have to make your own aesthetic decisions. This is true not only of the buyers of art, but for the artists as well. There are gallery owners, private dealers, curators, and art critics to guide you, but there are so many types of art out there and so many ways they are being promoted, that you have to hone in on what you like first to start finding those who might advise you. Here are just a few things I am noticing now in San Diego:

1.     The rise of the artist curators. A curator finds a point of view and then gathers artist around a theme, shops the idea to venues and help administer the relation between the venue and the artist. There are a number of professional curators but we are also seeing artists step forward and put on shows that will include their own work as well as others that supports a certain topic. This might be a one off, or a continuing job for an artist capable of bringing these skills together.

2.     The new artist rebels. There have always been the bad boys and girls of art, but previously a gallery dealer would be the buffer between them and the buyer and would make decisions about how the work was promoted. The artist might be belligerently pulled out of their own world and paraded on occasion and that was part of the mystique. The new rebel artist calls all the shots. No artist statement, no labels, even confusion about art pricing. You can almost hear them saying, “If you don’t understand my art, it is not for you. Fuck off.” By nature, these artists are unpredictable, but that is the attraction. The work is often challenging, even uncomfortable.

3.     New generation of master artists. These artists have been around the block. They are no longer emerging but are hitting their stride. The work is usually recognizable and they have shown so often that there is a great deal written about the work. Prices are more or less established and, with luck, rising. There is a maturity about the work which might change more slowly or become even more deeply invested in their style and interests. They have gallery representation, maybe even in more than one city and/or have connections with many museums.

4.     Transitioning artists. Once defined as emerging artists, I see these artists more concerned with defining themselves on an ongoing basis. The art world no longer demands a recognizable style, so these artists can search openly for what mediums and themes interest them. Their exhibitions might at first look like a number of different artists are showing. But they are free to explore their interest in a more holistic way.  

So as an art buyer, you can decide if you want a challenge, if you want something to match the couch, if you want to invest in an artist with a proven track record, if you want to follow an artist on the journey of discovery. And this may not be an either/or decision. All of these different artists can make work of excellence and so one of the main responsibilities you have is training your eyes to be discerning. This takes time and is your own journey of discovery.

You can see a series of in depth remote guest interviews with artists from the UCSD 2021/2022 series. The first was Every Ocean Hughes , a transdisciplinary artist and writer.

You can find more information about art collecting on our SmART Collector featured on San Diego Visual Arts Network.

Wednesday, September 22, 2021

California Creative Corps Pilot Program Development Update


 

California Creative Corps Pilot Program Development Update

Yes. I waded through the 217 page document for the Sept 22 California Arts Council meeting and sat through the delayed agenda item for the California Creative Corps Pilot Program (scheduled time 1:30 pm actually time 2:50 pm. Time spent on this item about 9 minutes.  I have included the relevant information below but what you need to know is that in October 2021 CAC staff will begins recruitment of  California Creative Corps Program Development Community Panel via a survey shared via social media, etc; Council and staff will be invited to reach out through their networks to encourage self-nominations. So watch for that announcement if you want to be involved.

Here is your summary but read the whole section starting on page 155: California Creative Corps Pilot Program Development

The 2021 State Budget included $60 million one-time General Fund for the California Arts Council to implement the California Creative Corps Pilot Program, a media, outreach and engagement campaign designed to increase: (1) public health awareness messages to stop the spread of COVID-19; (2) public awareness related to water and energy conservation, and emergency preparedness, relief, and recovery; (3) civic engagement, including election participation; and (4) social justice and community engagement.

Using all art forms artists will create public messaging to positively advance local community work. Projects will cultivate trust, belonging, community cohesion, and interdependence—particularly in communities that are most impacted.

These are regional messengers that are culturally rooted to advance civic communication and bring resources to a sector that has been disproportionately economically impacted by COVID-19, including artists who are Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) that have experienced the highest rates of unemployment in the arts sector (COVID-19 Pandemic Impact on the Arts, 2021).

Program Design: The CAC will implement a statewide grant program with an accompanying media, outreach, and engagement campaign.

·       This program will include training and technical assistance for grantees to apply for the grants.

·       Grants will provide economic support to artists, ambassadors, and cultural workers.

·       During the pilot, the CAC will welcome opportunities for private sector collaboration.

·       Looking to the future, the evaluation of the pilot’s impact may yield a process for future Creative Corps expansion.

·       The CAC Racial Equity Statement and Decision Support Tool practices will be used publicly for evaluation and data collection.

Grant guideline development will begin with the convening of a California Creative Corps Program Development Community Panel ("Panel") to include artists, culture bearers, creative individuals, and/or arts administrators that represent the priority populations to be engaged; representatives from other state departments and agencies engaged in public health activities; individual artists that are already working at the intersection of arts and  wellness, the environment, election participation, and social justice; and potential funding partners.

CAC staff is drafting a panel application form that will be distributed to Council before the end of this month. We hope the Council will use their networks to encourage the self-nomination of applicants as described above.

Timeline

September - October 2021: CAC staff begins recruitment of Panel via a survey shared via social media, etc; Council and staff will be invited to reach out through their networks to encourage self-nominations.

November - December 2021: Community Program Development Panel convenes to draft program guidelines and to discuss marketing and outreach.

January 15, 2022: Program guidelines and applications are released to the field.

January 15 - February 28, 2022: CAC staff markets the funding opportunity and provides technical assistance to potential applicants. Staff recruits panelists to adjudicate applications.

March 1, 2022: Deadline for all applications.

March - April 2022: CAC staff screens applications for eligibility. Staff facilitates the panel process, including applicant interviews and/or site visits, and identifies administering organizations.

May 1, 2022: Administering organizations are announced and contracts are awarded.

June 1, 2022 - May 31, 2024: Grant activity period. CAC provides ongoing support to administering organizations, particularly through marketing and media engagement of project activities.

May 31, 2023: Interim progress report due from administering organizations.

June - September 2023: Staff conducts interim program evaluation.

June 30, 2024: Final report due from the administering organizations.

July 1, 2024 - October 31, 2024: Staff conducts full pilot program evaluation.

The CAC is in the process of hiring a permanent, full-time researcher to lead a Program Evaluation, Outcomes, and Metrics as noted in the timeline above.  

While the Panel will be engaged in articulating specific, community-based metrics of success, the CAC has already identified the following as measurable outcomes for this program:

Qualitative Outcomes:
● Successful engagement of cross-sector partnerships at the state and municipal levels, and with community-based and grassroots organizations.
● Establishment of ongoing relationships with intergenerational community-recognized leaders to define needs and opportunities, and to develop strategies and infrastructure to respond to them.

Quantitative Outcomes:
● Total number of new communities served (counties and cities not strongly represented in prior CAC grantmaking).
● Total number of administering organizations engaged.
● Total number of artists employed.
● Total number of artists employed who identify as representing systemically marginalized communities (including but not limited to Arab, MENASA (Middle Eastern, North African, South Asian); Asian; Black, African American; California Native American, Indigenous, Tribal; Currently Experiencing Incarceration; Disabled; Elders, Seniors; Latinx, Chicanx; LGBTQIA+; Low Income; Neuro-Divergent; Pacific Islander; People of Color; Rural; Returned Residents, Formerly Incarcerated; Students of Color; Trans and/or Non-Binary People; Immigrants (Documented and/or Undocumented), Refugees, Asylum Seekers, Migrants; Unhoused, Transient; Veterans; or Youth.
● Total number of workforce hours.
● Total number of permanent positions created for artists in state and municipal government departments. 4
● Shift in attitude and readiness of community members to engage in healthy behaviors related to the COVID-19 pandemic.
● Shift in attitude and readiness of community members to engage in behaviors that support water and energy conservation.
● Shift in attitude and readiness of community members to participate in election activities.
● Shift in attitude and readiness of community members to engage in activities that support social justice outcomes.
● Total number of community listening sessions conducted.
● Total number of community listening sessions conducted in languages other than English.
● Total number of marketing and outreach collateral developed and distributed.
● Total number of marketing and outreach collateral developed and distributed in languages other than English.

P.S. While waiting for this topic to come up there was some discussion of the grants that were approved for individual artists. They funded 95 Emerging Applicants (2-4 years) that ranked 5.2+ ($475,000 allocation) 66 Established Applicants (5 to 10 year) that ranked 5.4+ ($660,000 allocation) and 21 Legacy Applicants (over 10 years) that ranked 5.2+ ($1,050,000 allocation) for a total of $2,185,000. This was out of 3108 applications received or only about 6% of the applicants got funding. For future funding they will look into raising the number of years spent by a legacy artist. There is a formal process of appeal online but all appeals and complaints are researched and could be found to be valid or not and then resolved by admin. All of the recipients and even the applicants were listed in this document starting on page 61.  

Tuesday, August 17, 2021

A Red Letter Day with the passage of a proposal for a County Commission for Arts and Culture

by Patricia Frischer


Image credit: Thanks to Fritzie Urquhart for her interpretation of my enthusiasm for San Diego Arts and Culture

 #8 REIMAGINE VIBRANT COMMUNITIES THROUGH ARTS & CULTURE

We have been working at SDVAN for over 10 years with a dedicated group to bring back a SD County Arts and Culture government agency. Today was a red letter day as all five Supervisors voted to advance this proposal to the next stage.  A huge thank you to the supervisors Vargas and Fletcher. We are excited to see who the Chief Administrative office will appoint to complete the following recommendations.

  1. Assess the role the County of San Diego already plays in arts and culture, including an assessment of how Community Enhancement Program grants have been provided to arts and culture organizations.
  2. Identify opportunities to leverage state and federal funding to ensure nontraditional arts and culture organizations are included.
  3. Look at how to increase equity in the access to arts and culture in the region and capitalize on the economic potential of an increased arts and culture program throughout the county to build equity.
  4. Report back to the board within 90 days with a recommendation on how to expand the role of the County in promoting and participating arts and culture opportunities, including the creation of a Commission on Arts and Culture.


We always give thanks to our beloved Larry Baza for championing this effort. 

You can hear the session #8 in the first ½ hour of the following utube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=etQYQAQ74dg

Thank you to those who stuck it out and spoke in person or on the phone and to the wonderful support from the following 86 who wrote comments on the county website. 

Tom Noel at August 15, 2021 at 9:31am PDT My late partner Larry Baza was an advocate for the arts in San Diego. He believed that the arts help to create a stronger environment for life and progress. As an arts administrator and as a member of the California Arts Council, Larry saw the creation of a Countywide Arts Council, supported by the Board of Supervisors as a top priority for the region he loved. Larry passed away in February, or he would be here today to ask all the Supervisors to join him in supporting agenda item 8. Thank you.

John Rippo at August 14, 2021 at 10:46pm PDT Philosopher Eric Hoffer said that for a place to home to creativity, thought and action, it has to be easy to live in, have no fear of failure, enough capital, more intellectual capital and sufficient resources. He may as well have described San Diego. As our history shows, creativity pays and always has; by reanimating a dedicated Arts and Culture org within County, you will aid artistic, creative, intellectual and other development in ways yet unknown to the future. God knows we need that.

Craddock Stropes at August 14, 2021 at 10:42pm PDT The arts and culture community has given so much to the region in terms of jobs, investment dollars and quality of life; it deserves a dedicated County arts commission commensurate with other world-class communities. Thank you for this milestone opportunity to ensure the future of arts and culture in our region. As a longtime patron, volunteer and former staff member of several arts organizations in San Diego, I am urging you to please pass the Recommendations for Item #8.

Ann Gilbert at August 14, 2021 at 6:17pm PDT I strongly believe that the arts are critical to restrengthening our community, both psychologically and physically post covid. Vibrant art and cultural activities that are open and available to everyone will build our community and relationships.

Lonnie Hewitt at August 14, 2021 at 4:49pm PDT As an arts writer, I would very much like to see you pass Item #8: Reimagine Vibrant Communities Through Arts and Culture. It will be great to have a county arts agency and especially great if you involve local artists and arts organizations in its formation. Thanks in advance for your support! I think you'll be proud to see the future results of your culture-enriching decision.

Diana Casey at August 14, 2021 at 10:22am PDT The San Diego Women's Chorus is a sisterhood of musicians that seeks to encourage women's creativity, celebrate diversity, and inspire social action. We support the recommendation of Supervisors Vargas and Fletcher with respect to an assessment of County arts and culture to promote the arts and equality to access. We also support the creation of a Commission of Arts and Culture. Funding from the County has been critical to keeping our doors open and promoting women's voices. Thank you.

Edward Parish at August 14, 2021 at 6:30am PDT We live in a wonderful and diverse commpunity............the arts are an integral part of our community providing growth and experience for all............thanks for your support in funding........it means a great deal.........again, much thanks.........Ed Parish

Keith Pedersen at August 13, 2021 at 10:38pm PDT I support the study of arts and cultural opportunities throughout our county. As a director of county-wide singing opportunities like the Point Loma Nazarene University Choral Union, summer sings offered by First United Methodist Church, and the Sacra/Profana Summer Choral Intensive at PLNU, I have seend how choral music enriches lives and brings people together from around the county. We need a county arts agency to ensure equal access and continued cultural opportunities for all San Diegans.

Sandi Slattery at August 13, 2021 at 5:28pm PDT It would be great to have a county arts agency. Much needed and long overdue. Please pass the Recommendations for item #8 "Reimagine Vibrant Communities Through Arts & Culture." It is important to please use the resources, knowledge and experience of Local Arts Agencies, artists, and arts organizations in the Administrator’s 90-day research efforts.

Kristianne Kurner at August 13, 2021 at 5:16pm PDT New Village Arts in District 5 enthusiastically supports the “Reimagine Vibrant Communities Through Arts & Culture” recommendations that will come before the Board on Tuesday, August 17. Diverse arts and culture are needed in our community now more than ever, and a commission that serves all of San Diego County will make a big impact.

Christopher Chalupsky at August 13, 2021 at 4:33pm PDT As a member of the San Diego Regional Arts & Culture Steering Commission and full-time arts administer leading the Arts Program at San Diego International Airport, I support - and ask you to support - the “Reimagine Vibrant Communities Through Arts & Culture” recommendations that will come before the Board on Tuesday, August 17. The benefits of this assessment extend beyond the arts & culture sectors and provide the opportunity to positively impact residents throughout the county.

Toni Robin at August 13, 2021 at 3:18pm PDT yes yes yes to a county arts commission!

Raul Cabral at August 13, 2021 at 2:46pm PDT We as artist, don’t feel that the city supports our work. We are vulnerable more than ever since the pandemic. We need your support and help more than ever.
Thank you,
Raúl Cabral

ANAMARIA CABATO at August 13, 2021 at 2:37pm PDT On behalf of PASACAT, we support “Reimagine Vibrant Communities Through Arts & Culture.” We have been a recipient of CEP grants since 1997. The creation of a Commission for Arts and Culture is long over due. Our local artists are an integral part in making our region so vibrant and when there's vibrancy, there is joy, and when there's joy, there's peace. Now more than ever do we need the arts and what better way than to support this recommendation.

Christopher Conroe at August 13, 2021 at 2:35pm PDT Christopher Conroe in District 3 supports the “Reimagine Vibrant Communities Through Arts & Culture” recommendations that will come before the Board on Tuesday, August 17.

----||||---///---||||---///\\\---||||----\\\\----||||-----
"Art for the sake of Art."

Michelle Kantor at August 13, 2021 at 2:31pm PDT As an artist, I have found very little assistance or facilitation from this council. Went to one meeting and I was confounded by the disregard for the artist community in San Diego. Very little or no outreach, particularly during the pandemic and moving forward. Just interested in the funding for their council members and bureaucrats working within their community. The artists have no representation in this city. The City Council might acknowledge this sad state of affairs.

Timothy Shields at August 13, 2021 at 1:58pm PDT The Old Globe Theatre, one of San Diego’s leading performing arts institutions, is located in District 3 but provides a variety of programs to the diverse citizens in every supervisorial district. We strongly support the “Reimagine Vibrant Communities Through Arts & Culture” recommendations that will be before the Board on Tuesday, August 17, and hope that you’ll pass them without delay. As we exit the pandemic providing for support of arts and cultural organizations is much needed.

Peter Kalivas at August 13, 2021 at 1:49pm PDT The PGK DANCE Project of District 4 serves residents and visitors countywide and wishes your support of our mission, purpose and vision:

• To be a platform that produces and presents professional dance representative of the world around us.

• Where dance is more affordable and more easily available to all through partnerships with community places, spaces and technology.

• To create paid opportunities for a wide variety of dance artists that help sustain our mission, purpose, vision.

Felicia Shaw at August 13, 2021 at 1:46pm PDT On behalf of the Women’s Museum of California - D4 - and as a 44-year resident of SD County and patron of the arts, I lend my support to the “Reimagine Vibrant Communities Through Arts & Culture” recommendations that will come before the Board on Tuesday, August 17. This is a historic opportunity to create opportunities for increased County support for arts and culture. With no fiscal impact to the budget, the time is right to move forward!

Heath Fox at August 13, 2021 at 1:40pm PDT The La Jolla Historical Society in D4 enthusiastically supports the “Reimagine Vibrant Communities Through Arts & Culture” recommendations that will be presented on August 17. We reach all areas of the County through collaborative exhibitions and programs, serving both residents and cultural tourists. This is an historic opportunity for the County to invest in the cultural life of all San Diego communities, and we strongly urge the Supervisors to pass these recommendations. Thank you!

Matt Carney at August 13, 2021 at 1:15pm PDT On behalf of the San Diego Ballet that resides in D4 and does arts programming in all County Districts, we support the “Reimagine Vibrant Communities Through Arts & Culture” recommendations that will come before the Board on Tuesday, August 17. Thank you for this historic opportunity and please pass all of the Recommendations. This coordinated effort will help to amplify that arts and culture services county wide. This is more than doing art....it is about uplifting the entire community!

Patricia Frischer at August 13, 2021 at 1:12pm PDT As the founder of SD Visual Arts Network with 2500 resources listed county wide, we thank you for this milestone opportunity to have a county arts agency. Please pass the Recommendations for item #8 Reimagine Vibrant Communities Through Arts & Culture. It is important to please use the resources, knowledge and experience of Local Arts Agencies, artists, and arts organizations in the Administrator’s 90 day research efforts. This is a long overdue and much needed agency for our entire county.

Christopher Hines at August 13, 2021 at 1:06pm PDT Arts and culture institutions support a thriving community and provide opportunities for tourists to fall in love with our community. The amount of money that enters the city from arts and culture patrons should be reason alone to support the arts. The added, and more noble, effect it has on underserved and underrepresented communities goes without saying.

Nivardo Valenzuela at August 11, 2021 at 5:15pm PDT Our region will benefit greatly from a department promoting the creative industries present in our county as well as an agency that supports cultural policy across the five districts. According to a report published by the San Diego Regional EDC and the City of San Diego in Fall 2020, the fiscal impact of creative industries in the region of San Diego is $11.1 Billion. We need an agency that transforms our region into an international and multicultural dynamic, vibrant, thriving creative hub.

Andy Washburn at August 11, 2021 at 2:46pm PDT I’m writing in support of Agenda item 8 - REIMAGINE VIBRANT COMMUNITIES THROUGH ARTS & CULTURE
Some of the reasons to support the arts in our county are:
• The arts help build and unify communities.
• The arts increase tourism revenue for our local businesses.
• The arts improve creativity, innovation, and well-being in individuals.
The arts are humanity’s soul.
Thank you for your consideration.

Helen Kupka at August 15, 2021 at 4:24pm PDT As chair of the Coronado Cultural Arts Commission, I support "Reimagine Vibrant Communities Through Arts and Culture". I would hope the study involves arts organizations, creatives and commissions such as our own to provide a well-rounded picture of both the impact and potential we provide for our communities and the region. I would love to see the re-establishment of an arts council at the county level, including representation from the our communities and financial support from the County.

Lynn Underwood at August 16, 2021 at 10:27am PDT This is an important aspect of our community and should be honored and activated.--This quote underscores the importance: A diverse board can do much more than “check the box.” It can expand the knowledge, experience and insight that go into a community's decision-making, and it can ultimately lead to both an improved culture and growth.

Brigid Parsons at August 16, 2021 at 10:23am PDT I have been involved in local arts for 14 years: Oceanside (current chair of Arts Commission, OMA, FF Oceanside Art Walk, Studio ACE), North County (secretary of NCAN, former Arts Assistant for the city of Encinitas), county-wide arts organizations (County Confab) and state (CAC panel member and rep). We thank you for this milestone opportunity to work toward a county-wide arts agency to represent all areas of the county, especially those that currently have no arts civic infrastructure.

Julia Fister at August 16, 2021 at 10:20am PDT Thank you, Supervisor Vargas and Fletcher for this opportunity to discuss a county wide arts agency. At the most basic level we need some sort of Chamber of Commerce for the Arts as a way to promote the arts as an economic driver and an innovative way to collaborate with and reinforce the County’s primary goals and objectives. I support recommendations in agenda item #8 for stronger arts and culture representation in San Diego County.

Shelley Herron at August 16, 2021 at 10:06am PDT As a member of the San Diego Festival Chorus, I benefit personally from participation in the arts in East County. In addition, my daughter with Down syndrome has participated in Arms Wide Open, a performing arts program for people with special needs, based in El Cajon. I support more access to participation in and attendance at arts and culture events. Thank you for your attention to this issue!

Dalouge Smith at August 16, 2021 at 10:02am PDT Please take this first step to formalizing the County's support for equitable investment in arts & culture! It has been over 25 years since the County had any staff with arts & culture expertise so please call on the Chief Administrative Office to collaborate with an advisory group of local artists, administrators, and activists who work with historically marginalized youth and adults most negatively impacted by inequity in housing, health, workforce, education, and justice systems.

Holly MartinBollard at August 16, 2021 at 9:08am PDT As the director of operations for the Timken Museum of Art, I see firsthand the positive impact of arts across age groups and segments of society. I support the proposed recommendations in agenda item #8 and the foundation it provides for a vibrant arts and culture community.

Bob Lehman at August 16, 2021 at 8:41am PDT The San Diego Museum Council (D4), with more than 40 museums located in every San Diego County district, strongly supports the creation of a San Diego County Commission for Arts and Culture (Agenda item 8 - REIMAGINE VIBRANT COMMUNITIES THROUGH ARTS & CULTURE). We commend Chair Fletcher and Supervisor Vargas for their leadership in this historic opportunity to strengthen our County's arts and culture community, a major component of our region's economic success.

TE Caballero at August 16, 2021 at 1:39am PDT I support the recommendations to "Reimagine Vibrant Communities Through Arts & Culture" (17 August 2021 BOS Meeting Item #8). It is valid to task the County's CAO with a report on how to expand the County's role in arts and culture, as well as how to reestablish the County's Arts and Culture Commission. Deep listening to diverse communities, patrons, and practitioners within our border region is needed. Right will, knowledge, and action yields much abundance that can be equitably shared.

Andrew Utt at August 15, 2021 at 11:22pm PDT As Executive Director of the Institute of Contemporary Art, San Diego in Districts 3 and 4, we support the “Reimagine Vibrant Communities Through Arts & Culture” recommendations that will come before the Board on Tuesday, August 17. These recommendations will be the essential first step towards driving San Diego as a cultural destination that is inclusive in its approach. We hope that Supervisors Lawson-Remer, Desmond, and Anderson agree and support arts and culture for years to come.

Denise Sarram at August 15, 2021 at 8:40pm PDT I am an artist in North county San Diego, which is a vibrant visual and performing arts community. Thank you Supervisors Vargas and Fletcher for your support of #8. What we need to take this to the next level is paid art professionals to help form this new county agency.
The entire county will benefit from this!

Anne Porter at August 16, 2021 at 11:12am PDT I support the creation of a County Arts Council in order to consolidate funding opportunities for arts groups in San Diego under one umbrella. Especially during the Pandemic, our arts groups keep us active, engaged and producing art in many innovative ways, and they need support. One arts council for the County will provide information about arts activities throughout the County, for the County. San Diego is too big a County to not have an arts council. Thank you for your consideration.

Victoria Hamilton at August 16, 2021 at 11:46am PDT Please support #8 directing the CAO do a 90-day assessment of County arts and culture, identify and leverage opportunities for funding arts and culture throughout the County, identify ways of building equity in access - and ultimately - to create a County Commission on Arts and Culture (and what it would look like). Thank you

This has been long needed and could create a real opportunity for more County support for arts and culture. There is NO fiscal impact to do the assessment.

Naomi Nussbaum at August 16, 2021 at 11:28am PDT Thank you Supervisors Vargas and Fletcher for recommending Item #8 Reimagine Vibrant Communities Through Arts & Culture.
Our arts community needs equal representation at the County level. Through our creativity and innovative ideas, I believe a county-wide arts agency will promote the arts as an economic driver to make San Diego an international arts destination as well as complement and enhance the County’s goals and objectives.

Andrew Waltz, Director of Programs, NTC Foundation at August 16, 2021 at 11:23am PDT Andrew Waltz in District 1 supports the “Reimagine Vibrant Communities Through Arts & Culture” recommendations that will come before the Board on 08.17.21. Call on the Chief Administrative Office to collaborate with an advisory group of local artists, administrators, and activists who work with historically marginalized youth and adults most negatively impacted by inequity in housing, health, workforce, education, and justice systems.

Deanne sabeck at August 16, 2021 at 12:29pm PDT As an long time artist in the San Diego community, I urge you to please pass the Recommendations for item #8 Reimagine Vibrant Communities Through Arts & Culture. It is important to use the resources, knowledge and experience of Local Arts Agencies, artists, and arts organizations in the Administrator’s 90 day research efforts. This is a long overdue and much needed agency for our entire county.

Michael Rennie at August 16, 2021 at 12:11pm PDT Michael Rennie in District 2 supports the “Reimagine Vibrant Communities Through Arts & Culture” recommendations that will come before the Board on 08.17.21. In the absence of a County Arts Commission, Arts groups located outside San Diego City limits have been severely limited in their access to State and Federal Funds earmarked for Arts and Culture. The creation of a County Arts Council is long-overdue and stands to benefit the 2 million County residents who live outside SD City limits.

Kayla Moshki at August 16, 2021 at 11:50am PDT Thank you Supervisors Vargas and Fletcher for recommending Item #8 Reimagine Vibrant Communities Through Arts & Culture.
Our arts community needs equal representation at the County level. Through our creativity and innovative ideas, I believe a county-wide arts agency will promote the arts as an economic driver to make San Diego an international arts destination as well as complement and enhance the County’s goals and objectives.

Manuel Aguilar at August 16, 2021 at 12:52pm PDT As a board member of the San Diego Museum Council and a ticket services representative from the Old Globe Theatre which are both headquartered in District 4, I support the “Reimagine Vibrant Communities Through Arts & Culture” recommendations that will come before the Board on Tuesday, August 17th. I agree to having the County’s Chief Administrative Officer perform a 90-day assessment of the County’s arts and culture needs so that a County Commission on Arts and Culture can be created.

Molly TerbovichRidenhour at August 16, 2021 at 12:32pm PDT As President & CEO of the San Diego Civic Youth Ballet in District 3, we support the “Reimagine Vibrant Communities Through Arts & Culture” recommendations that will come before the Board on Tuesday, August 17. These recommendations will be the essential first step towards driving San Diego as a cultural destination that is inclusive in its approach. We hope that Supervisors Lawson-Remer, Desmond, and Anderson agree and support arts and culture for years to come.

Mel Lions at August 16, 2021 at 12:30pm PDT Arts and culture define us and the communities in which we live, and provide the meaning and context in which our lives take place. San Diego County abounds with influences from myriad cultures, each offering different perspectives and ways of expressing them for the public to enjoy: music, food, fine arts, folk arts, poetry, dance. The more we share world views through the arts, the stronger the fabric of our greater community becomes. All great regions are recognized by their culture. Are we?

Amie Hayes at August 16, 2021 at 1:35pm PDT Supervisors, SOHO supports all four recommendations related to the Reimagine Vibrant Communities through Arts and Culture. The Arts and Culture industry will play a large role in the recovery of our local economy, thank you for discussing this topic. SOHO also encourages this assessment and identification effort tap into the resources, expertise, and experience of local arts agencies, artists, cultural workers, and arts/culture organizations.Thank you,
Bruce Coons
Executive Director, SOHO

Marti Kranzberg at August 16, 2021 at 1:00pm PDT Last century a group of passionate professionals concerned about city planning & development established a local chapter of Partners for Livable Places. We did the homework and based on the studies of “Economics of Amenities” we found out the Truth: Investments in “amenities,” (Art & Culture) PAYS off. There are lot’s of great reasons to support the Arts, but the bottom line- there is significant increase in $value for all of our communities when we invest in the Arts. Your support helps us grow

David Frink at August 16, 2021 at 1:58pm PDT As a member of Imperial Beach Arts Bureau, I heartily support item #8, "Reimagine Vibrant Community Through Arts & Culture. A truly vibrant Art Scene throughout the region could be a real draw for visitors & yet another reason for us to be proud to live here!

Ken Stipanov at August 16, 2021 at 2:17pm PDT As Chair of the Board of the NTC Foundation, I urge approval of this measure.

Wendy WilsonGibson at August 16, 2021 at 4:42pm PDT As an artist, curator and arts administrator working in all districts of San Diego County, I support the “Reimagine Vibrant Communities Through Arts & Culture” recommendations. As the director of the Bonita Museum & Cultural Center and the Bonita Historical Society (District 1), I appreciate working hand in hand with the County to provide equitable opportunities to enrich our communities.

erika torri at August 16, 2021 at 4:01pm PDT I am the director for the Athenaeum Music & Arts Library (Library Association of La Jolla) and we encourage you to pass the "Reimagine Vibrant Communities Through Arts & Culture." Programs through this will allow us and other institutions to continue provide educational programming in music and arts throughout San Diego County. Through our La Jolla location as well as our satellite branch, Athenaeum Art Center, in Logan Heights we can promote youth arts education.

Becky Goodman at August 16, 2021 at 3:51pm PDT La Jolla Playhouse (District 4) urges you to pass the “Reimagine Vibrant Communities Through Arts & Culture” recommendations. The Playhouse’s Learning & Engagement team consistently reaches out across all County Districts to deepen reciprocal relationships with community members, including students, educators, military/veterans, adult learners, incarcerated youth and other groups for whom the arts are less accessible. A county-wide arts and culture coalition will enhance this important work.

Steve dilley at August 16, 2021 at 3:42pm PDT Dear County Supervisors,
Having a county wide Arts council/agency is a great idea for advocacy and outreach. As the Executive Director of The Veterans Art Project. We need more Art making studios that are supported by the county of San Diego in general. Art making equals wellness for our Military connected populations.
As the state contract holder for the MHSOAC contract for Veterans health and wellness through pop-up Art cafe. Mental health is mental wealth. Thank you

Debra Emerson at August 16, 2021 at 3:21pm PDT This is important for our community as a whole. Culture and Arts builds economics in our community and gives many with different people show their talents and earn income in different forms of art. St. Madeleine Sophie's Center has a gallery that supports people intellectual and developmental disabilities show their abilities not their disabilities. They can be artist and shine with their abilities not their disabilities.

Lisa Davenport at August 16, 2021 at 3:08pm PDT It's more important than ever to give artists the reign to do what we do best, create and encourage creativity and have a say as to how we move ahead in promoting arts in this city. San Diego is not just about the beaches and sports, but we need to show now more than ever we are a city for the arts.

Elizabeth Washburn at August 16, 2021 at 2:57pm PDT Please support the creation of a County Arts Commission. In this time of uncertainty, we need the arts to be supported to help alleviate stress and bring people (safely) together.

Mary Hale at August 16, 2021 at 5:40pm PDT Please support this initiative!

Marshall Carder at August 16, 2021 at 5:29pm PDT There is nothing more important for our children and the future of our communities than instruction in Art and Culture. The power of art to teach and to heal is well documented and has been mostly forgotten by those in power. Please help us to fund this program!!

Joseph Olesky at August 16, 2021 at 5:18pm PDT As a Veteran of the US NAVY, who served honorably and with distinction in the Medical Corp. Currently, as a therapist, who worked therapeutically at Veteran Village, I have seen the need for ancillary services such as art, for Veterans to better deal with their PTSD and other combat issues in lieu of heavy medication, drugs/alcohol. I wholeheartedly support this organization.

Tina Christiansen at August 16, 2021 at 5:18pm PDT I support this program as a 30 year resident who has seen how the arts has grown in our community and enriches all our lives. Please approve!

Sherry Hansen at August 16, 2021 at 5:12pm PDT I am on the Board of the Imperial Beach Arts Bureau. I support anything that furthers interest, education & desire to continually beautify our community.

Edward Spriggs at August 16, 2021 at 5:51pm PDT Imperial Beach is home to a large public arts collection supported by the Port of San Diego and has a vibrant volunteer run group called the I B Arts Bureau who has raised funds and Commissioned dozens of new murals. We support this Initiative as a small city the County taking the lead will support our efforts and we in turn will connect with the County. Thank you Supervisor Vargas and Fletcher for your leadership, our whole community will benefit. Imperial Beach Mayor Pro Tem, Ed Spriggs

Naimeh Woodward at August 17, 2021 at 10:02am PDT As the founder of Encinitas Friends of the Arts, I thank you for this opportunity to have a county arts agency. Without our efforts, our under served members would not have access to cultural art programs. Please pass the Recommendations for item #8 Reimagine Vibrant Communities Through Arts & Culture. It is important to use the resources, knowledge and experience of Local Arts Agencies, artists, and arts organizations in the Administrator’s 90-day research efforts. Thank you.

Lindy Mamer at August 17, 2021 at 8:00am PDT I support the “Reimagine Vibrant Communities Through Arts & Culture” recommendations that will come before the Board on Tuesday, August 17. I think the arts give people a way to cope and better understand the complicated world we all face. It is an important mental health support and is needed throughout San Diego.

Alessandra Moctezuma at August 17, 2021 at 7:42am PDT Arts and culture are essential to our city and county. As a curator, artist and professor of Fine Art and Museum Studies at San Diego Mesa College I witness how the arts enrich the lives or our students and community. We have incredible artists and cultural organizations (big and small) in our region. They are invested in working with our diverse populations and they need more resources and support. Art and culture is also what connects us to the community in the Baja region. Please support.

Kazmier Maslanka at August 16, 2021 at 11:41pm PDT What is the cultural identity of San Diego? Most people outside of the city will exclaim it is the weather, palm trees, or the beach. While these aspects are fine for the tourist business there is so much more our city has to offer. There are numerous subcultures that need to be heard to help provide an identity that transcends the mundanity of the weather. The expression of art is the vehicle that connects all our subcultures and an arts council will help direct our diverse cultural identity.

Nicole Verdes at August 16, 2021 at 10:14pm PDT San Diego's arts and culture community is vital to our economy and to the health and wellbeing of us all. Support for Reimagining Vibrant Communities Through Arts and Culture is an opportunity to build a more equitable and accessible cultural framework here in San Diego. Respectfully submitted--in honor of Larry T. Baza. Sincerely, Nicole Verdes, Pronouns: she/they, Board President, Lambda Archives

Irene Abraham at August 16, 2021 at 9:28pm PDT I am currently the Chair of the Encinitas Commission for the Arts. I strongly support the formation of a San Diego County Commission for Arts and Culture funded by the County Supervisors . Currently we are one of only a few counties in California that does not have such a Commission. The Arts have repeatedly been shown to be a strong driver of economic activity and participation of the entire County in the Arts is important to the vitality of our region.

Tonya Savice at August 16, 2021 at 8:42pm PDT As a Air Force Veteran, I wholeheartedly support the Arts for healing and mental wellness. I’ve been involved in Veterans Art Project located in Vista. It has helped me tremendously while dealing with MST and PTSD issues. To have other facilities for veterans to participate Is a win- win for the veteran and community.

Kathy Archibald at August 16, 2021 at 8:40pm PDT I support Arts & Culture investment! It pays dividends in healthy kids and adults!

Laurie Coskey at August 17, 2021 at 10:23am PDT As the Executive Director of the San Diego Community College District Foundation located at the ECC sitei we see the difference that arts make in community. We house the Theater that will be going under restoration and will be building a gallery space. Our theater has been the primary home for two black under resourced theater companies; Common Ground Theater and the Ira Aldridge Players who provide great performances and necessary voices and opportunities for inclusion! Let's work together!

Denise Rogers at August 17, 2021 at 11:46am PDT Good morning Board of Supervisors,
I am writing in support of the "Reimagine Vibrant Communities Through Arts & Culture." I am an Art History professor for the San Diego Community College District. San Diego has a vibrant arts and cultural community that is underfunded. Support is needed to ensure that local arts organizations can continue support underrepresented communities and new opportunities are made available for an arts and cultural centers in local neighborhoods.

Linda Sotelo at August 17, 2021 at 11:24am PDT On behalf of New Americans Museum as the Executive Director, and será advocate leading an organization serving the immigrant, refugee and county wide families I/we are in full support of Supervisors Vargas’ and Fletcher’s proposal for a County Commission on Arts and Culture to unify, represent and set an equity based agenda to serve the regions diverse cultural needs.

Rich Porter at August 17, 2021 at 12:11pm PDT Economic impact of the arts in the City of SD: $500,000,000. The City has a Commission on Arts and Culture to promote a healthy arts community. Population of unincorporated area of the county is 500,000. They deserve a county agency to support the arts, too. Individual communities' identities are supported in part by active arts and culture organizations; each community is recognized by its local arts culture. There is every reason to move forward with a county-wide program for the arts.

Anjanette MarayaRamey at August 17, 2021 at 3:18pm PDT Support REIMAGINE VIBRANT COMMUNITIES THROUGH ARTS & CULTURE. As a first generation Filipina-American who grew up in the South Bay, I had limited access to transformative power of the arts. As the founder, CEO and Artistic Director of a new small business called MARAYA PERFORMING ARTS in Chula Vista, I've witnessed first hand that the arts can provide economic development and job opportunities, social emotional growth & healing for historically marginalized communities. Invest in the arts!

James Aitchison at August 17, 2021 at 1:39pm PDT I would like to express my support for the creation of a countywide “Reimagine vibrant communities through arts and culture” organization. We know children who participate in arts education are better students. We know arts in a community are an economic engine. Establishing this organization will maximize participation and availability of the arts to all who live in or visit our region.

Marcus Deridder at August 17, 2021 at 1:31pm PDT Hi, I work for the New Children's Museum and have previously worked for art supply stores. As an artist myself, I recognize the importance of supporting and funding San Diego's arts community. It's currently underground, invisible to the naked eye, and so many of its voices are being silenced due to lack of representation and even acknowledgment. Please do what you can to elevate its vibrancy ●☆♡☆● thanx

Kate Gevanthor at August 17, 2021 at 1:30pm PDTI support the reestablishment of the Arts and Culture Commission

Anna Siqueiros at August 17, 2021 at 12:49pm PDT I'm the President & Founder of the Siqueiros Foundation of the Arts, focused on community outreach & establishing a vital connection for SECAN. San Diego is one of the largest counties in California & the country. It's essential to represent cultural diversity through the arts—a firm presence to put our artistic endeavors on the map. We need to uplift arts & culture to bring a change for San Diego’s arts community & importantly its youth—serving our mission to bring color to a concrete world.

Rich Porter at August 17, 2021 at 12:11pm PDT Economic impact of the arts in the City of SD: $500,000,000. The City has a Commission on Arts and Culture to promote a healthy arts community. Population of unincorporated area of the county is 500,000. They deserve a county agency to support the arts, too. Individual communities' identities are supported in part by active arts and culture organizations; each community is recognized by its local arts culture. There is every reason to move forward with a county-wide program for the arts.

Denise Rogers at August 17, 2021 at 11:46am PDT Good morning Board of Supervisors,
I am writing in support of the "Reimagine Vibrant Communities Through Arts & Culture." I am an Art History professor for the San Diego Community College District. San Diego has a vibrant arts and cultural community that is underfunded. Support is needed to ensure that local arts organizations can continue support underrepresented communities and new opportunities are made available for an arts and cultural centers in local neighborhoods.

Jovita Arellano at August 17, 2021 at 5:03pm PDT I would like to express my support for the creation of a countywide “Reimagine vibrant communities through arts and culture” organization. I'm a member of the United Lowrider Coalition. It's essential to represent the lowrider community in its cultural diversity through the Arts. The lowrider community is throughout San Diego and is seldom seen as arts and culture. This is the perfect reason to vote yes on this issue and move forward.

Alan Ziter at August 17, 2021 at 4:17pm PDT I'm writing on behalf of the San Diego Regional Arts & Culture Coalition, which has been working since 1989 to increase Public Support for the Arts. Today is an historic day in the County’s efforts to Reimagine Vibrant Communities Through Arts & Culture, thanks to Supervisors Vargas and Fletcher. SDRACC encourages YES on Item 8, and offers the resources, knowledge and experience of Local Arts Agencies, artists, cultural workers and arts and culture organizations in your 90 day research.


Saturday, July 10, 2021

The Blue Economy

by Patricia Frischer 


In 2014 we produced an exhibition call the DNA of Creativity and one of the 4 programs we funded was Sea Change: Act. Kira Carrillo Corser, Director, Sea Changes ACT Project is still advocating because: “Our oceans are losing millions of sea life due to climate change, plastic pollution, and over-fishing. Art can bypass fear and build knowledge, while promoting positive change to communicate our loss, our choices and our future.”

Recently, I attended a recent presentation arranged by Mira Costa’s LIFE program by SeaTrec’s owner, inventor and CEO Dr. Yi Chao. His mission is to map the ocean floor. Although most countries have documented their own coast lines, 80% – 90% of the open ocean floor has not been mapped. This is important because 1. A fundamental variable is unknown (enquiring minds want to know), 2. There is a need for navigational safety and efficiency, and 3. Data is needed for resource management for all sorts of industries like fisheries, future mining, weather forecasting, species discovery and preservation. We don’t know the topography of the floor, or the different temperature levels or even all of the currents. And this is because the information is so hard to access in the water and so vast. 


There are only a few vessels doing this work and the future is certainly going to be with new robotic data collection and connections to satellite communications. Currently there are surface robot from companies like OceanAero, SubSeaSail which can be fueled by wind and sun. Right now, there are 4000 robots already in the sea but fueled by huge lithium batteries. They need to be replaced every four years so 1000 a year sink to the bottom of the ocean bed, with no way of finding and removing them.  There is no regulation about dumping batteries in the ocean. They are considered disposable and certainly not sustainable. The companies that make these robots, can keep selling them to the military and research companies who are their biggest consumers. They have no real profit motive in sustainability. This is irresponsible but only public shame and government restrictions will change this practice. 

But there is a solution.  An undersea robot energy source is what is needed and SeaTrec is supplying the tech for sustainable robots. Therma energy is stored in the ocean supplied by the sun. The closer to the equator and the to the surface, the warmer the ocean is. There are many ways to harvest big temperature changes. The trick is how to harness the 20 C degree difference in temp which is small but worldwide.  SeaTrec specializes in this small difference in ocean temperature with an invention using a sensitive wax which expands when it heats up near the surface. The pressure this expansion causes when squeezed from one chamber to another, creates the energy to recharge the battery. It can be stored to send the robot back down where the wax solidifies. Each robot is outfitted with these self-contained mini-charging stations. Larger charging stations might be possible in the future to recharge propeller driven robots for all sorts of task. 




Currently the battery driven robots are collecting data on temperature variation, but adding sound echo sensors will enable mapping of the sea floor. The robots have to come to the surface to communicate to satellites but a series of relays to boast signals might also come in the future. SeaTrec envisions 10,000 sustainable robots for an initiative called SeaBed 2030.

You might ask if currents could be used for sustainable energy, but most ocean current are quite weak.  Remember, you only see wind turbines in strong windy places. And this tech could be used on land because of the difference in temperature from day to night, but the land already has much more reliable and cheaper sources of energy. The market is only in remote places and that is not really financially competitive. 

SeaTrec originally got its funding from research and government sources like Nasa and the Navy. Now that it is a for profit company it has sales contracts, license fee for their technology, private foundations, small business grants, private capital Angel investors. They want to expand to make data available to commercial shipping, sea farming, and mining so that these industries are able to make better decisions. 


It seems like the one thing missing here is a way to get the public interested in the progress that SeaTrec has made and the services that they are offering to bring pressure to bear on companies using the old lithium battery technology. This is where the arts have a role to play by bringing in an emotional component to communications.  The arts excel at this.  Dr. Yi Chao sees a future to help climate change, to supply a reliable food source, to make more predictable weather forecasting, and maybe even have a time when we can all interact with the ocean in a sustainable way.   

Lots of inventions would not get made if the inventors did not start businesses. But business is not just research. It demands a whole new set of skills. SeaTrec located in Vista is looking for staff and interns but not just for the science stuff but for marketing, communication, and business abilities.

More info: SeaTrec 626.386.5988 yi@seatrec.com 

To hear the entire presentation until the end of 2021, click here



Friday, June 18, 2021

Desperate Times


 

I have never seen a reputable gallery ever hold a gallery sale, so I was curious when I started to see this happen.  I asked myself a number of questions. “Gallery Sale” - Maybe the wording is just a come on…i.e., the works in the gallery are always on sale. But then, are they creating an expectation of lower prices that will not be fulfilled? Are artists discounting their own work or is the gallery prepared to reduce the prices on the stock of work they own outright?  Does creating open discounts diminish the value of works already sold and undermine collector confidence? Does this mean slashed prices? That sounds like someone is going out of business! Unusual times call for unusual policies, so this is a confusing subject.

To understand this, you need to know that galleries have an understanding with the artist when sales prices are set. There is usually a percentage of discount that can be given without contacting the artist for permission to sell the works for less than the asking price. The gallery could also reduce its commission, but the artist, in the most optimal arrangement has final say on the sales price paid.

And many galleries have their own private collection of works of art. Some stock is acquired of artist that they think is a good investment. They might hold on to the work and wait for it to escalate. Or they might buy work by their own stable of artists that comes up for sale on the secondary market. They may even have been buying work in auction in order to protect the value of works by artists they are selling. They have complete control of the final price for any of these works that they own outright.

The gallery may also be holding work on consignment for clients who are placing them at the gallery to try to resell work that they previously bought. It could be those clients need the money quickly and are willing to reduce their prices, or the gallery is prepared to reduce its commission charge for this second purchase.

So, in most cases at high end galleries, the word “sale” can simply be a case of negotiating on the final sales price. Maybe before a sale, the greater discount is discussed with the artists. Maybe the gallery is prepared to take a lower price than they previously had decided for certain of their works in private stock. Or maybe a client has reduced his asking price for a work on consignment to the gallery.

In none of these instances, should you see dramatic drop in prices as that could indeed trigger a crisis in confidence in the artist’s value.

Are there other ways to drive collectors into galleries at this desperate time, without announcing a sale? Of course, and I can think of just a few:

·        Buy a work and get a discount on a work in another less expensive media, a print perhaps.

·        Ask artists to consign less expensive works to the gallery for example a special one off run of monotypes.

·        Get groups of collectors to buy large works together and rotate them from home to home from year to year

·        Rent out works for a rent to own price.

·        Hold dinner parties in the gallery so collectors can meet the artists and we can all finally get out of the house!